About EDM Drug Culture

A Brief Look into EDM Drug Culture:

What is MDMA?

MDMA is an acronym for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine. This is an illegal, powerful, psychoactive drug which comes in capsule or tablet form and taken orally. Sometimes people open the capsules and are able to snort the contents. MDMA produces an energizing effect and heightened sensitivity. It is also known to produce distortions in time and perception. The effects last about three to six hours and is not uncommon for people to ingest a second dose as the effects from the first dose begin to dim. If you think you may have become addicted to MDMA or EDM drug culture in general, help is only a phone call away. Contact El Paso Drug Treatment Centers today for help finding the best treatment options for your recovery.

Slang Terms for MDMA

MDMA is known on the street by several names including, but not limited to:

  • Malcolm X
  • Candy
  • Beans
  • Dancing Shoes
  • Disco Biscuits
  • X or E
  • Ecstasy
  • Molly
  • Hug Drug
  • Scooby Snacks

If someone is high on MDMA, they may use these terms to describe themselves or someone else:

  • Raver
  • Raving
  • Thizzing
  • Rolling
  • E-tard
  • Cuddle Puddle
  • E-Puddle
  • Flipping

It is important to know these terms because it might tip you off that someone is high and may have a drug problem.

EDM

EDM or electronic dance music is popular music heard in clubs and raves that has a repetitive beat and synthesized backing track. EDM includes techno, house, trance, dubstep, drum and bass and trap music, to name a few. The tempo dictates which category the music falls into, for example, techno's tempo is 120-150 BPM (beats per minute). EDM drug culture has gained notoriety through music festivals where people are known to consume drugs like MDMA to heighten their senses, enjoy the experience in a different way, and maybe, to stay awake all night. Music festivals such as Ultra, Electronic Daisy Carnival, and Tomorrowland have been described by festival-goers as a place where they can be themselves and where they feel a sense of comradery. EDM drug culture extends beyond MDMA. However, MDMA (or Molly) seems to be the most prevalent. Drug use and EDM may very well go hand-in-hand for a significant amount of people.

Side Effects

There are a number of side effects of MDMA. A few to be aware of:

  • Dehydration
  • Muscle cramping
  • Involuntary jaw clenching
  • Hyperthermia (significant rise in body temperature)
  • Sweating
  • Nausea
  • Chills
  • Blurred vision

The dangers of Molly at raves can be very serious. Since the initial effects cause a feeling of a general sense of well-being and emotional warmth, it can be easy to "over-do" it. People normally take Molly at places associated with vigorous physical activity – clubs and raves – which can cause hyperthermia. The body temperature and raise so high as to result in kidney failure is not treated by a physician promptly. Dangers of Molly at raves are not a laughing matter. People become dehydrated and in some individuals – molly can reduce the pumping efficiency of the heart, especially if they are over-exerting themselves.

Side effects of MDMA have far reaching consequences beyond the even at which it is consumed. People have reported side effects lasting over a week after initial ingestion such as:

  • Thirst
  • Lack of appetite
  • Anxiety
  • Restlessness
  • Sadness
  • Irritability
  • Reduced interest and pleasure from sex

Drug use and EDM is a topic of interest if you or someone you love attends events at which you think they might be using. Look out for the signs and side effects. Drug use and EDM is not likely to go away any time soon. If you or someone you love is addicted to MDMA, please contact El Paso Drug Treatment Centers for help finding treatment options today.

Sources:

https://casapalmera.com/nicknames-street-names-and-slang-for-mdmaecstasy/

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/mdma-ecstasy-abuse/what-mdma

ElPasoDrugTreatmentCenters.com

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/26/edm-culture_n_5518106.html

 

 

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